A few years ago I remember seeing alarmist stories that claimed your cell phone could cause cancer. Last week, a Medium article questioned the safety of Bluetooth devices.

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In the article, Jerry Phillips, a biochemistry professor at University of Colorado talks about wireless headphones being not as safe as we think.

“My concern for AirPods is that their placement in the ear canal exposes tissues in the head to relatively high levels of radio-frequency radiation.”

The story also cites a petition, signed by 250 scientists, from the United Nations and World Health Organization that suggests raising regulatory standards for Bluetooth devices.

We are scientists engaged in the study of biological and health effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields (EMF). Based upon peer-reviewed, published research, we have serious concerns regarding the ubiquitous and increasing exposure to EMF generated by electric and wireless devices. These include–but are not limited to–radiofrequency radiation (RFR) emitting devices, such as cellular and cordless phones and their base stations, Wi-Fi, broadcast antennas, smart meters, and baby monitors as well as electric devices and infra-structures used in the delivery of electricity that generate extremely-low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF EMF).

However, not everyone is on the same page. Health.com spoke with a professor of bioengineering at the University of Pennsylvania who is not buying the hype. His research focuses on the safety of electromagnetic fields.

“What’s the news here? Someone’s trying to play the media by resurrecting this petition. “I can’t say there’s absolutely no problem with these devices - but personally, I have no concern."